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How to Negotiate Salary for Your Job Offer

Posted by Kathleen Smith

You’ve received a job offer but you’re not pleased with the salary being offered. What do you do? HR Specialist Patra Frame discusses the best strategy for negotiating your offer, including salary.

Your first consideration is, do you really want the job? Don’t waste anyone’s time with negotiations for a position that doesn’t interest you. If you do want to negotiate the offer, your key points are:

1. Thank the recruiter or hiring manager for the offer.
2. Restate your interest and the value you bring to the position.
3. Ask for the specific changes to the offer you would like to see — two to three changes max — with the business reasons for the changes.
4. Be quiet!

For more details, check out the video below: 

This entry was posted on Thursday, June 16, 2011 3:04 pm

2 thoughts on “How to Negotiate Salary for Your Job Offer”

  1. Good basic advice, BUT when asking for the salary review in 3/6/12 months, what is to prevent to company from continuing to say "no" to any increase. It seems the company still holds all the cards, especially when it is as subjective as the review process. If at this time, we still don't "get what we want" are we then to think seriously that the decision to work for the company in the first place was flawed? Should we then begin the job search again? What other options are there which can be more objective during the review, especially in an analytical/technical services career field?

  2. Nothing prevents the company from refusing additional money. HOWEVER, most companies will not promise a salary review early (3 to 6 months) and not intend to actually look at performance and giving a pay raise. Note that when you start any new job you want to set up some performance goals and understand your role in relation to larger issues (see video on Smart Start: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ec0L_JiJFo&feature=related ) And few companies want to risk their investment in you by promising a pay review and not giving you any more money. So, unless your performance is weak or you are a problem attitude person, you are likely to get that early pay raise or a bonus add-on.

    And, if you are really concerned about objective measures of performance, that is something you should be researching when you select target companies and ask about it during the interview process.

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